The Dangers of Washing Machines

There’s a lot of waiting around during the blessings of the graves, especially in cemeteries like St Colmcille’s in Swords, North County Dublin. My mum’s family are buried in the older part of the cemetery, towards the back, and as the blessings start in the newer section, it always takes a while for the priestsContinue reading “The Dangers of Washing Machines”

Selling to women through 1960s magazine advertorials

I’m currently writing a chapter on the all-electric house for my book about everyday lives in 1960s Ireland. Past readers of this blog will know that I’m using women’s magazines as a way of establishing trends and expectations. Leafing through the pages of the magazines, a particular type of article recurs: the advertorial. These pieces explored variousContinue reading “Selling to women through 1960s magazine advertorials”

Modern Wife, Modern Life Exhibition at the National Print Museum of Ireland

I am delighted to announce that the National Print Museum of Ireland has agreed to host my exhibition, Modern Wife, Modern Life. It will run between August and October 2015.

Pushing the Boundaries: Sex Advice in Women’s Magazines, 1960s Ireland

Manuals on how to be a good wife were widely available in Ireland at the start of the twentieth century. Publications such as The Young Wife (1938 edition), provided women with practical advice on such matters as housekeeping and budgeting, or emotional guidance on understanding and caring for her husband. They did not, however, generally offer adviceContinue reading “Pushing the Boundaries: Sex Advice in Women’s Magazines, 1960s Ireland”

Advertising Domestic Violence?

Last week afforded me the opportunity to spend the week at the National Library of Ireland continuing my research on the everyday lives of Irishwomen. I was working my way through copies of Woman’s Way magazine from the mid-1960s when I discovered somewhat unsettling advertisements for Kincora Carpets. The advertisements recognised the fact that women wereContinue reading “Advertising Domestic Violence?”

The Dagenham Women, Equal Pay and Women’s Rights

I’ve just spent a wonderfully entertaining afternoon in the presence of Vera Sime, Eileen Pullen, Gwen Davies and Sheila Douglas — the women who inspired the 2010 film Made in Dagenham (of which they remarked, the basic story was there, but it was dressed up a bit).  The Business School at the University of Hertfordshire organised theContinue reading “The Dagenham Women, Equal Pay and Women’s Rights”